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Overexpression of the tomato <i>glutamate receptor-like</i> genes <i>SlGLR1.1</i> and <i>SlGLR3.5</i> hinders Ca<sup>2+</sup> utilization and promotes hypersensitivity to Na<sup>+</sup> and K<sup>+</sup> stresses

  • Aouini Asma
    Gene Research Center, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba Gene Research Center, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Hernould Michel
    UMR 619 Physiology and Plant Biotechnology, National Institute of Agronomical Research, Bordeaux Universities 1 et 2 UMR 619 Physiology and Plant Biotechnology, National Institute of Agronomical Research, Bordeaux Universities 1 et 2
  • Ariizumi Tohru
    Gene Research Center, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba Gene Research Center, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Matsukura Chiaki
    Gene Research Center, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba Gene Research Center, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Ezura Hiroshi
    Gene Research Center, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba Gene Research Center, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Asamizu Erika
    Gene Research Center, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba Gene Research Center, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba

Bibliographic Information

Other Title
  • Overexpression of the tomato glutamate receptor-like genes SlGLR1.1 and SlGLR3.5 hinders Ca²⁺ utilization and promotes hypersensitivity to Na⁺ and K⁺ stresses

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Abstract

Thirteen glutamate receptor-like genes have recently been identified in tomato plants; however, their functions have not been fully elucidated. We overexpressed SlGLR1.1 and SlGLR3.5 in Arabidopsis and found that transgenic plants showed symptoms such as curled and deformed leaves, dwarf stature and retarded growth resembling those of Ca2+ deficiency. The results revealed that the levels of Ca2+ in aerial tissues did not differ between wild-type and transgenic plants, suggesting that overexpression of SlGLR1.1 and SlGLR3.5 did not affect Ca2+ uptake. Transgenic lines were hypersensitive to K+ and Na+ ionic stresses, which was rescued by addition of Ca2+ to the growth medium. Ectopic expression of SlGLR1.1 and SlGLR3.5 resulted in reduced efficiency of Ca2+ utilization, suggesting that these genes may play a role in calcium assimilation in tomato plants by controlling ionic transport across the membrane.

Journal

  • Plant Biotechnology

    Plant Biotechnology 29 (3), 229-235, 2012

    Japanese Society for Plant Biotechnology

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Details

  • CRID
    1390001204326905600
  • NII Article ID
    10030804561
  • NII Book ID
    AA11250821
  • DOI
    10.5511/plantbiotechnology.12.0213a
  • COI
    1:CAS:528:DC%2BC38Xht1ChtbzJ
  • ISSN
    13476114
    13424580
  • NDL BIB ID
    023784305
  • Text Lang
    en
  • Data Source
    • JaLC
    • NDL
    • Crossref
    • CiNii Articles
  • Abstract License Flag
    Disallowed

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