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Impact of Resting Heart Rate on Cardiovascular Mortality According to Serum Albumin Levels in a 24-year Follow-up Study on a General Japanese Population: NIPPON DATA80

  • Liu Yiwei
    Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine
  • Hirata Aya
    Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine
  • Okamura Tomonori
    Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine
  • Sugiyama Daisuke
    Faculty of Nursing and Medical Care, Keio University
  • Hirata Takumi
    Department of Public Health, Hokkaido University Faculty of Medicine
  • Kadota Aya
    Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science
  • Kondo Keiko
    Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science
  • Ohkubo Takayoshi
    Department of Hygiene and Public Health, Teikyo University School of Medicine
  • Miura Katsuyuki
    Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science Center for Epidemiologic Research in Asia, Shiga University of Medical Science
  • Okayama Akira
    Research Institute of Strategy for Prevention
  • Ueshima Hirotsugu
    Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science Center for Epidemiologic Research in Asia, Shiga University of Medical Science

Abstract

<p>Background: Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality. However, the findings of cohort studies differed. Thus, the impact of RHR on CVD mortality might be different according to the background of the population. Therefore, we examined the relationship of RHR and CVD mortality according to serum albumin (ALB) levels in a Japanese general population.</p><p>Methods: In total, 8,363 individuals without a history of CVD were followed for 24.0 years. The participants were divided into four groups according to the quartiles of RHR (Q1–Q4), and they were further classified into the high and low ALB groups based on a median value of 44 g/L. We estimated the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of CVD mortality in each RHR group based on ALB levels, and the interaction between RHR and ALB groups on CVD mortality was evaluated.</p><p>Results: We found no significant association between RHR and CVD mortality. However, the Q4 of RHR was significantly associated with an increased risk for CVD mortality (HR 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–1.57) in participants with a low ALB level. Meanwhile, the Q4 of RHR was significantly correlated with a decreased risk for CVD morality in those with a high ALB level (HR 0.61; 95% CI, 0.47–0.79) after adjusting for covariates. A significant interaction between RHR and ALB for CVD mortality was shown (P < 0.001).</p><p>Conclusions: The impact of RHR on CVD mortality differed according to ALB levels in a general Japanese population.</p>

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