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The influence of properties of daily life events on selecting other persons in self-evaluation process : From viewpoints of self-assessment motivation and self-enhancement motivation

  • NISHIMURA Takashi
    Graduate School of Biosphere Sciences, Hiroshima University:Research Fellow of the Japan Society for Promotion of Sciences
  • URA Mitsuhiro
    Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University
  • HASEGAWA Koji
    Research Fellow of the Japan Society for Promotion of Sciences:Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences, Hiroshima University

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Other Title
  • 出来事の特質の差異が自己評価過程における他者選択に及ぼす影響 : 自己査定動機と自己高揚動機の観点から
  • デキゴト ノ トクシツ ノ サイ ガ ジコ ヒョウカ カテイ ニ オケル タシャ センタク ニ オヨボス エイキョウ ジコ サテイドウキ ト ジコ コウヨウドウキ ノ カンテン カラ

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Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between daily life events and self-evaluation processes. Two hypotheses were examined. First hypothesis is that task-relevant events would activate one's self-assessment motivation, and this motivation would increase one's preference for others who they usually view as a person to give objective advises. On the other hand, socio-emotional events would activate one's self-enhancement motivation, and this motivation would increase one's preference for others who they usually view as a person to give affective advises. Second hypothesis is that, although higher preference for objective others after task-relevant events would gradually shift to higher preference for affective others, one's preference for affective others after socio-emotional events would stay higher than one's preference for objective others. A total of two hundred and twenty six students (undergraduates, graduate students and nursing school students) completed the questionnaire including a hypothetical situation on either task-relevant or socio-emotional events. The results, consistent with the hypotheses, showed that one's preference for objective others was higher than one's preference for affective others after task-relevant events, but one's preference for affectivity increased gradually. On the other hand, one's preference for affective others was higher than one's preference for objective others after socio-emotional events, and this tendency was sustained. Implications for self-disclosure research, and directions for future research are also discussed.

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