[Updated on Apr. 18] Integration of CiNii Articles into CiNii Research

Initial Stage of an Infestation of Platypus quercivorus (Coleoptera: Platypodidae) in a Secondary Forest Dominated by Quercus serrata and Quercus variabilis.

  • Akaishi D.
    Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University
  • Kamata N.
    Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University
  • Nakamura K.
    Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University Institute of Nature and Environmental Technology, Kanazawa University and Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University

Bibliographic Information

Other Title
  • コナラ・アベマキ二次林におけるカシノナガキクイムシの初期加害状況
  • コナラ アベマキ 2ジリン ニ オケル カシノナガキクイムシ ノ ショキ カガイ ジョウキョウ

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Abstract

We surveyed the initial stage of a Platypus quercivorus infestation in a secondary forest dominated by Quercus serrata and Q. variabilis. Forty-three of 646 Q. serrata and 49 of 645 Q. variabilis trees were infested. The trees of both species were more severely infested at the ridge than on the slope. There was no entry hole found on trees smaller than 15 cm in diameter at breast height (DBH). Logistic regression showed that the percentage of infested trees increased with DBH, and also showed that Q. serrata was more infested than Q. variabilis. For both Q. serrata and Q. variabilis, the percentage of trees that exuded sap from their trunks was significantly greater in infested trees than in non-infested trees. In this study site, the mortality of infested trees might be lowered by discharge of sap. Forests with mature Q. serrata and Q. variabilis in the lowlands may play a role as refuge for P. quercivorus populations migrating from highland Q. crispula forests.

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