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Fungal Carbonyl Sulfide Hydrolase of <i>Trichoderma harzianum</i> Strain THIF08 and Its Relationship with Clade D β-Carbonic Anhydrases

  • Masaki Yoshihito
    Graduate School of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
  • Iizuka Ryuka
    Graduate School of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
  • Kato Hiromi
    Graduate School of Life Sciences, Tohoku University
  • Kojima Yuka
    Graduate School of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
  • Ogawa Takahiro
    Graduate School of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
  • Yoshida Makoto
    Graduate School of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
  • Matsushita Yasuhiko
    Gene Research Center, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology
  • Katayama Yoko
    Graduate School of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology Independent Administrative Institution, Tokyo National Research Institute for Cultural Properties

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Other Title
  • Fungal Carbonyl Sulfide Hydrolase of Trichoderma harzianum Strain THIF08 and Its Relationship with Clade D β-Carbonic Anhydrases

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Abstract

<p>Carbonyl sulfide (COS) is the most abundant and long-lived sulfur-containing gas in the atmosphere. Soil is the main sink of COS in the atmosphere and uptake is dominated by soil microorganisms; however, biochemical research has not yet been conducted on fungal COS degradation. COS hydrolase (COSase) was purified from Trichoderma harzianum strain THIF08, which degrades COS at concentrations higher than 10,000 parts per million by volume from atmospheric concentrations, and its gene cos (492 bp) was cloned. The recombinant protein purified from Escherichia coli expressing the cos gene converted COS to H2S. The deduced amino acid sequence of COSase (163 amino acids) was assigned to clade D in the phylogenetic tree of the β-carbonic anhydrase (β-CA) family, to which prokaryotic COSase and its structurally related enzymes belong. However, the COSase of strain THIF08 differed from the previously known prokaryotic COSase and its related enzymes due to its low reactivity to CO2 and inability to hydrolyze CS2. Sequence comparisons of the active site amino acids of clade D β-CA family enzymes suggested that various Ascomycota, particularly Sordariomycetes and Eurotiomycetes, possess similar enzymes to the COSase of strain THIF08 with >80% identity. These fungal COSase were phylogenetically distant to prokaryotic clade D β-CA family enzymes. These results suggest that various ascomycetes containing COSase contribute to the uptake of COS by soil.</p>

Journal

  • Microbes and Environments

    Microbes and Environments 36 (2), n/a-, 2021

    Japanese Society of Microbial Ecology / Japanese Society of Soil Microbiology / Taiwan Society of Microbial Ecology / Japanese Society of Plant Microbe Interactions / Japanese Society for Extremophiles

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