Relationship Between Shape of Keyword and Memory Retention in an Undergraduate Elective Course

DOI
  • MAYAMA Kazue
    Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology
  • JAHNG Esther
    Mrs.T.H.Chan Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Southern California
  • KURISHIMA Kazuhiro
    Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology
  • HONDA Sumihisa
    Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Nagasaki University
  • JAHNG Doosub
    Graduate School of Life Science and Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology

Bibliographic Information

Other Title
  • 大学の専門科目授業におけるキーワードの形状と記憶状況との関連
  • ダイガク ノ センモン カモク ジュギョウ ニ オケル キーワード ノ ケイジョウ ト キオク ジョウキョウ ト ノ カンレン

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Abstract

Teachers commonly prepare for classes by summarizing the learning materials in plain language and presenting them as keywords to the students. The web version of Key Words Meeting (KWM), an education and training support tool, is an interactive learning system that uses ICT to electronically gather data on students’ memory retention rates of keywords that teachers input into the system. In this study, the relationships between word counts, parts of speech, and memory retention rates were examined. Data was collected through KWM for an undergraduate engineering elective course from 2014 to 2018. Results showed that memory retention rates were higher when main keywords, which act as titles, had lower word counts and when sub-keywords, which supplement the main keywords, had higher word counts. Morphological analyses revealed that memory retention rates were higher when main keywords contained combinations of nouns and when sub-keywords contained combinations of parts of speech other than nouns. Results suggest that different combinations of parts of speech and word counts affect memory retention. Further research on the characteristics of teachers’ keywords that yield high memory retention rates may lead to improved learning and memory for students in classes.

Journal

Details

  • CRID
    1390856539345638272
  • NII Article ID
    40022785380
  • NII Book ID
    AA1145146X
  • DOI
    10.24466/jbfsa.23.2_1
  • ISSN
    24242578
    13451537
  • NDL BIB ID
    031901582
  • Text Lang
    ja
  • Data Source
    • JaLC
    • NDL
    • CiNii Articles
  • Abstract License Flag
    Disallowed

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