[Updated on July 12] Integration of CiNii Articles into CiNii Research from April 1, 2022

Screening of lactic acid bacteria that can form mixed-species biofilm with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  • Soichi Furukawa
    Department of Food Bioscience and Biotechnology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, Fujisawa, Japan
  • Ryosuke Isomae
    Department of Food Bioscience and Biotechnology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, Fujisawa, Japan
  • Noriko Tsuchiya
    Department of Food Bioscience and Biotechnology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, Fujisawa, Japan
  • Satoru Hirayama
    Department of Food Bioscience and Biotechnology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, Fujisawa, Japan
  • Asuka Yamagishi
    Department of Food Bioscience and Biotechnology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, Fujisawa, Japan
  • Miho Kobayashi
    NARO Institute of Livestock and Grassland Science, Ibaraki, Japan
  • Chise Suzuki
    NARO Institute of Livestock and Grassland Science, Ibaraki, Japan
  • Hirokazu Ogihara
    Department of Food Bioscience and Biotechnology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, Fujisawa, Japan
  • Yasushi Morinaga
    Department of Food Bioscience and Biotechnology, College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, Fujisawa, Japan

Abstract

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>The abilities of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to form mixed-species biofilm with Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a static co-culture were investigated out of 168 LAB stock cultures, and two Lactobacillus plantarum strains (D71 and E31) and one Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain K01 were found to form mixed-species biofilm with S. cerevisiae BY4741. SEM observation showed that there was no significant difference in morphological properties among these three mixed-species biofilms and they resembled that formed by S. cerevisiae with L. plantarum ML11-11 previously isolated from a brewing sample of Fukuyama pot vinegar. The co-aggregation assays showed that L. plantarum D71 and L. plantarum E31 could co-aggregate with S. cerevisiae similarly to L. plantarum ML11-11, while L. mesenteroides K01 had no ability to co-aggregate with yeast. The above results indicate that aggregation followed by direct cell-to-cell contact is required for mixed-species biofilm formation between these L. plantarum strains and S. cerevisiae, though some different mechanism may be involved in biofilm formation between L. mesenteroides strain and S. cerevisiae.</jats:p>

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