Lipidomic profiling of dairy cattle oocytes by high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry for developmental competence markers

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A comparative lipidomic profiling analysis of dairy cattle oocytes with different developmental competences was performed using a combination of high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical analysis. Significant lipidomic changes were identified in degenerating oocytes. Total triacylglycerol in the degenerating oocytes was 1.8-fold higher than that in the normal oocytes; however, total cardiolipin was 53.5% lesser than that in the normal oocytes, which indicated attenuation of energy metabolism. Compared to those in the normal oocytes, triacylglycerols in the degenerating oocytes were composed of longer and more unsaturated acyl chains. In contrast, the acyl chains in free fatty acids present in the degenerating oocytes were shorter and with lesser degree of unsaturation compared to those in the normal oocytes. Moreover, a significant decrease in degenerating oocytes were found in total phosphatidylinositol (14.8 +/- 7.6 pmol vs. 24.8 +/- 5.5 pmol), total phosphatidylcholine (20.8 +/- 8.7 pmol vs. 33.5 +/- 7.2 pmol), and total plasmalogen ethanolamine (9.0 +/- 4.7 pmol vs. 16.8 +/- 5.2 pmol), which indicated dysfunction of lipid-metabolizing enzymes in oocytes during degeneration. Thus, increase of triacylglycerols together with the decrease of certain phospholipid species could be potential markers of oocyte developmental competence. In addition to providing a new approach to investigate the lipidomic changes in oocyte development, the lipidomic profiling in the present study has revealed insights that hold potential to unravel the role of lipid metabolism in oocyte developmental competence in cattle. (C) 2019 Elsevier lnc. All rights reserved.

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