Oxidative DNA Damage Induced by 364-nm UVA Laser in Yeast Cells

  • Negishi Kazuo
    Okayama University Advanced Science Research Center, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • Higashi Shoichi
    Okazaki National Research Institutes, National Institute for Basic Biology
  • Nakamura Takanori
    Okazaki National Research Institutes, National Institute for Basic Biology
  • Otsuka Chie
    Research Institute for Biological Sciences
  • Watanabe Masakatsu
    Okazaki National Research Institutes, National Institute for Basic Biology
  • Negishi Tomoe
    Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences

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The mechanisms of the toxic effects of UVA (320-400 nm) irradiation remain unclear. The actions of monochromatic longer wavelength UVA, in particular, have been difficult to analyze because of a lack of a powerful light source; however, a UVA laser that can be used for biological studies was recently developed. In the current studies, we examined the effects of 364-nm irradiation on yeast cells using a potent UVA laser. We found that, when irradiated under aerobic conditions, yeast cells lacking Ogg1 glycosylase were more sensitive than those with Ogg1. The ability of the 364-nm light to kill the yeast cells was almost eliminated by purging with argon gas. The mutagenic effects of the UVA irradiation did not appear to be enhanced by a lack of Ogg1. These results indicate the killing of yeast cells by 364-nm UVA may be dependent on oxidation and may involve DNA lesions that can be repaired by Ogg1.<br>

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