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BIOREMEDIATION FIELD TRIAL OF OIL-CONTAMINATED SOIL WITH FOOD-WASTE COMPOST

  • HARA Eri
    Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • KURIHARA Masato
    Idea Bank Liaison Company Co. Ltd.
  • NOMURA Nobuhiko
    Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • NAKAJIMA Toshiaki
    Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • UCHIYAMA Hiroo
    Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba

Abstract

 In recent years, the cleanup of oil-contaminated sites by bioremediation has attracted much attention. In order to perform an effective bioremediation, suitable oil-degrading microorganisms should be induced in the remediation site with the accompanying nutrients. In this study, we investigated the bioremediation effects of 4 interventions-compost derived from food waste (food-waste compost), chemical nutrients, mushroom, and biofertilizer-versus no intervention (control) in a bioremediation field trial of oil-contaminated soil. Whereas the concentration of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) in the control section remained largely unchanged throughout the experiment, large reductions in TPH concentrations were seen with all interventions. In particular, compost greatly decreased TPH concentrations, from 8,300 ppm to 2,300 ppm after 74 days. Furthermore, we obtained an understanding of the behavior of oil-degrading bacteria by quantifying the alkane monooxygenase genes (alkB and alkM), the catechol 1,2-dioxygenase gene (C12O gene), and the catechol 2,3-dioxygenase gene (C23O gene). We observed a tendency for oil-degrading bacteria to increase proportionally in the sections in which THP degradation was observed. In particular, compost was more effective than the other interventions in inducing the growth of bacteria possessing the alkM and C23O gene, resulting in a significant reduction in the concentration of alkanes and aromatics. Thus, we demonstrated that the application of food-waste compost to bioremediation was very effective. This technique can simultaneously solve the 2 environmental problems of petroleum pollution and the increase in food waste.

Journal

  • Journal of JSCE

    Journal of JSCE 1 (1), 125-132, 2013

    Japan Society of Civil Engineers

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Details

  • CRID
    1390001205429952000
  • NII Article ID
    130004625888
  • DOI
    10.2208/journalofjsce.1.1_125
  • ISSN
    21875103
  • Text Lang
    en
  • Data Source
    • JaLC
    • Crossref
    • CiNii Articles
    • KAKEN

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