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Four Cases of Chemical Burn of the Fingers Caused by Hydrofluoric Acid

  • Onizawa Saori
    Department of Dermatology, Doctoral Program in Clinical Sciences, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Nakamura Yasuhiro
    Department of Dermatology, Doctoral Program in Clinical Sciences, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Ishitsuka Yosuke
    Department of Dermatology, Doctoral Program in Clinical Sciences, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Furuta Junichi
    Department of Dermatology, Doctoral Program in Clinical Sciences, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Ishii Yoshiyuki
    Department of Dermatology, Doctoral Program in Clinical Sciences, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Kawachi Yasuhiro
    Department of Dermatology, Doctoral Program in Clinical Sciences, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Otsuka Fujio
    Department of Dermatology, Doctoral Program in Clinical Sciences, Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba

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Other Title
  • フッ化水素酸による手指化学熱傷の4例
  • フッカ スイソサン ニ ヨル シュシ カガク ネッショウ ノ 4レイ

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Abstract

We experienced 4 cases of chemical burn of the fingers caused by hydrofluoric acid. (Case 1) A 35-year-old woman got burned by 1% hydrofluoric acid on the right middle finger after an experiment. (Case 2) A 51-yearold man felt severe pain in both hands after he used 9.5% hydrofluoric acid-containing agent without wearing gloves. (Case 3) A 38-year-old man felt severe pain in the right index finger, and the pain spread rapidly over all the fingers of his right hand after a 9.5% hydrofluoric acid-containing agent flowed inside his damaged right glove. (Case 4) A 38-year-old man felt severe pain in the right ring finger and had skin necrosis on the tip of its finger after 50% hydrofluoric acid used for semiconductor cleaning flowed inside his damaged right glove. The extent of a chemical burn of the fingers caused by hydrofluoric acid depends on the concentration of the hydrofluoric acid, and appropriate selection of the treatment is essential. If both the local and intravenous injections of calcium gluconate are ineffective for the severe pain, intraarterial injection should be utilized immediately to remove the pain.

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