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On Clement Greenberg's Formalistic Criticism

DOI

Bibliographic Information

Other Title
  • クレメント・グリーンバーグのフォーマリズム批評
  • クレメント グリーン バーグ ノ フォーマリズム ヒヒョウ

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Abstract

After Abstract Expressionism, American art was not modeled after European art any more. Many critics regarded Abstract Expressionism as a quite new art separate from the past tradition of paintings. But Clement Greenberg defined it as the only heir to the tradition of the European paintings, particularly of Modernist paintings. He regarded the history of paintings as the dialectic development periodically fluctuating between the "plastic" and the "painterly". (These words are translated from Wolfflin's terms "plastisch" and "malerisch".) As for Modernism, Greenberg equates its essence with reinforcing "self-criticism". That's why, Greenberg asserts, Modernist art attempted to be a pure art, and Modernist painting increasingly emphasized "flatness.". But, in Greenberg's view, such painting cannot be flat enough to be the physical surface of the canvas ; inevitably it permit a strictly optical illusion of a third dimention. Greenberg's theory of formalism is based on Kant's aesthetics. According to Kant, aesthetic judgment is first made possible by an intuitive grasp of the formal element of the object in the world of phenomenon, and then by balanced faculties of transcendental cognition. So Greenberg attaches much importance to aesthetic intuition. But on that point, there are some problems, which I would like to investigate.

Journal

  • Aesthetics

    Aesthetics 43 (1), 13-23, 1992

    The Japanese Society for Aesthetics

Details

  • CRID
    1390001205831215104
  • NII Article ID
    110003714010
  • NII Book ID
    AN0020658X
  • DOI
    10.20631/bigaku.43.1_13
  • ISSN
    24241164
    05200962
  • NDL BIB ID
    3465211
  • Text Lang
    ja
  • Data Source
    • JaLC
    • NDL
    • CiNii Articles
  • Abstract License Flag
    Disallowed

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