Preoperative Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Predicts Survival After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

  • Fukui Shogo
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine Graduate School of Health Management, Keio University
  • Kawakami Michiyuki
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine
  • Otaka Yohei
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine I, School of Medicine, Fujita Health University
  • Ishikawa Aiko
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine
  • Yashima Fumiaki
    Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine
  • Hayashida Kentaro
    Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine
  • Oguma Yuko
    Graduate School of Health Management, Keio University Sports Medicine Research Center, Keio University
  • Fukuda Keiichi
    Department of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine
  • Liu Meigen
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine

Abstract

<p>Background:This aim of this study was to clarify prognosis after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in patients with aortic stenosis (AS) and to identify baseline factors associated with mortality.</p><p>Methods and Results:We prospectively enrolled 257 consecutive elderly persons with AS who were referred to Keio University Hospital and who underwent assessment of cardiac, physical (walking speed), cognitive, and renal functions, nutritional status, activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental ADL (IADL) assessed with the Frenchay activities index (FAI), and comorbidities. The primary outcome was postoperative death. Differences in basic characteristics were compared between a group that survived for a median of 661 days (IQR, 0–1,289 days) after TAVI and a group that did not. Multivariate hazard ratios (HR) were calculated for independent factors selected in Cox proportional hazard models. Thirty-one individuals died during follow-up. Walking speed was significantly faster (0.87±0.25 vs. 0.70±0.24 m/s, P<0.001) and FAI was significantly higher (21.2±8.0 vs. 15.7±8.0, P=0.026) in the survival group compared with those who died. Multivariate HR for mortality according to walking speed was 0.05 (95% CI: 0.028–0.091) in model 1 and 0.04 (95% CI: 0.020–0.081) in model 2, and those for FAI were 0.94 (95% CI: 0.92–0.95) and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.90–0.92), respectively.</p><p>Conclusions:Preoperative walking speed and IADL are crucial factors associated with prognosis after TAVI even after adjustment.</p>

Journal

  • Circulation Reports

    Circulation Reports 2 (2), 83-88, 2020-02-10

    The Japanese Circulation Society

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