A Case of Hyperostosis Frontalis Interna with Frontal Lobe Dysfunction

  • Sainohira Kazutaka
    Department of Psychiatry, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences
  • Ishizuka Takanori
    Department of Psychiatry, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences
  • Tabata Kentaro
    Department of Psychiatry, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences
  • Yokotsuka Saeko
    Department of Psychiatry, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences
  • Arai Kaoru
    Department of Psychiatry, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences
  • Shiokawa Nari
    Department of Psychiatry, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences
  • Kasugai Motofumi
    Department of Psychiatry, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences
  • Nakamura Masayuki
    Department of Psychiatry, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences
  • Sano Akira
    Department of Psychiatry, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences

Bibliographic Information

Other Title
  • 前頭葉機能障害を呈した前頭骨内板過骨症の1例
  • ゼントウ ヨウ キノウ ショウガイ オ テイシタ ゼン トウコツ ナイバン カホネショウ ノ 1レイ

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Abstract

<p>Hyperostosis frontalis interna (HFI) is characterized by the bilateral thickening of the frontal bone of the skull. Although most patients with HFI show no clinical symptoms, a few have been reported to show diverse and non-specific symptoms, including-but not limited to-cognitive decline, epileptic seizure, and endocrine disorder. We experienced the case of an 80-year-old woman with cognitive decline, in whom HFI was discovered on MRI and CT. Neurophychiatric examinations revealed frontal lobe dysfunction. HFI was therefore suggested to be one of the causes of frontal lobe dysfunction.</p>

Journal

  • Kyushu Neuropsychiatry

    Kyushu Neuropsychiatry 63 (2), 88-93, 2017-08-15

    The Association of Kyushu Neuropsychiatry

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