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Types of step adjustment performed by baseball infielders when catching a grounder

  • Ogura Kei
    Faculty of Economics, Shiga University
  • Kawamura Takashi
    Faculty of Health and Sports Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Kanahori Tetsuya
    Faculty of Health and Sports Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Nomoto Takaki
    Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Yagi Yoshiki
    Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba
  • Onodera Kazuya
    Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba

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Other Title
  • 野球内野手のゴロ捕球におけるステップ調節様式
  • ヤキュウ ナイヤシュ ノ ゴロホキュウ ニ オケル ステップ チョウセツ ヨウシキ

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Abstract

 The purpose of this study was to clarify the types of step adjustment performed by baseball infielders for catching a grounder in relation to skill level. The subjects were 18 amateur baseball infielders, whose fielding motions were videotaped using 2 high-speed video cameras (300 Hz). The 3-dimensional coordinates of both the toes and the ball were obtained using the DLT method. The top 9 subjects who showed small variations in the grounding point of both feet when adopting the catching posture were defined as a high-performance group, and the bottom 9 subjects were defined as an intermediate-performance group. The results obtained were as follows:<br>  1) Baseball infielders modified each grounding point from 4 steps to 1 step before catching in order to acquire the most appropriate catching point, and the final step was highly reproducible.<br>  2) The high-performance group showed a significantly smaller standard deviation in the 1 step before the grounding point than the intermediate-performance group.<br>  3) In the high-performance group, there was a positive correlation between the standard deviation of step length 1 step before and the standard deviation of the grounding point from 5 steps to 2 steps before.<br>  These results suggest it is important to reduce variations in the grounding point 1 step before by earlier perception of the error in the front-to-rear direction of the grounding point. These results could provide important insight for coaches or trainers attempting to improve the performance of infielders when catching a grounder.<br>

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