[Updated on Apr. 18] Integration of CiNii Articles into CiNii Research

Effects of dietary soy protein on skeletal muscle volume and strength in humans with various physical activities

  • Hashimoto Rie
    Department of Nutritional Physiology, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima
  • Sakai Atsuko
    Department of Nutritional Physiology, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima
  • Murayama Masumi
    Department of Nutritional Physiology, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima
  • Ochi Arisa
    Department of Nutritional Physiology, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima
  • Abe Tomoki
    Department of Nutritional Physiology, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima
  • Hirasaka Katsuya
    Department of Nutritional Physiology, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima Graduate School of Fisheries and Environmental Studies, Nagasaki University
  • Ohno Ayako
    Department of Nutritional Physiology, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima
  • Teshima-Kondo Shigetada
    Department of Nutritional Physiology, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima
  • Yanagawa Hiroaki
    Tokushima University Hospital
  • Yasui Natsuo
    Tokushima University Hospital
  • Inatsugi Mikiko
    Inatsugi Orthopedic Hospital
  • Doi Daisuke
    Inatsugi Orthopedic Hospital
  • Takeda Masanori
    Kyoritsu Hospital
  • Mukai Rie
    Department of Food Science, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima
  • Terao Junji
    Department of Food Science, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima
  • Nikawa Takeshi
    Department of Nutritional Physiology, Institute of Health Biosciences, the University of Tokushima

Search this article

Abstract

Background: In recent years, the number of bedridden people is rapidly increasing due to aging or lack of exercise in Japan. This problem is becoming more serious, since there is no countermeasure against it. In the present study, we designed to investigate whether dietary proteins, especially soy, had beneficial effects on skeletal muscle in 59 volunteers with various physical activities. Methods: We subjected 59 volunteers with various physical activities to meal intervention examination. Persons with low and high physical activities were divided into two dietary groups, the casein diet group and the soy diet group. They ate daily meals supplemented with 7.8 g of powdered casein or soy protein isolate every day for 30 days. Bedridden patients in hospitals were further divided into three dietary groups: the no supplementation diet group, the casein diet group and the soy diet group. They were also subjected to a blood test, a urinalysis, magnetic resonance imaging analysis and muscle strength test of the knee before and after the meal intervention study. Results: Thirty-day soy protein supplementation significantly increased skeletal muscle volume in participants with low physical activity, compared with 30-day casein protein supplementation. Both casein and soy protein supplementation increased the volume of quadriceps femoris muscle in bedridden patients. Consistently, soy protein significantly increased their extension power of the knee, compared with casein protein. Although casein protein increased skeletal muscle volume more than soy protein in bedridden patients, their muscle strength changes by soy protein supplementation were bigger than those by casein protein supplementation. Conclusions: The supplementation of soy protein would be one of the effective foods which prevent the skeletal muscle atrophy caused by immobilization or unloading. J. Med. Invest. 62: 177-183, August, 2015

Journal

Citations (8)*help

See more

References(18)*help

See more

Related Projects

See more

Details

Report a problem

Back to top