A longitudinal study of early childhood caries risk, dental caries, and life style

  • Ibrahim Sukaeni
    Department of Behavioral Pediatric Dentistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Science
  • Nishimura Michiko
    Department of Behavioral Pediatric Dentistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Science
  • Matsumura Seishi
    Department of Behavioral Pediatric Dentistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Science
  • Rodis Omar M.M.
    Department of Behavioral Pediatric Dentistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Science
  • Nishida Ayami
    Department of Behavioral Pediatric Dentistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Science
  • Yamanaka Kaori
    Department of Behavioral Pediatric Dentistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Science
  • Shimono Tsutomu
    Department of Behavioral Pediatric Dentistry, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Science

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Abstract

The objectives of this longitudinal study were to assess children’s caries risk and mean number of decayed teeth and determine their life style factors that influence their caries activity. A total of 283 children were selected based on the following criteria: they had 1.5, 2.5, and 3.5-year-old oral examinations, participated in Cariostat microbial sampling and the mother of a child filled out the questionnaires. Caries experiences of children were 2.1% for the 1.5-year-old, 8.1% for the 2.5-year-old, and 14.8% for 3.5-year-old period, respectively. Caries risk at the 1.5-year-old period showed significant differences (P < 0.001) for mean number of decayed teeth when children were at the 2.5-, and 3.5-year-old period. A significant difference (P < 0.01) was also seen for caries risk at the 2.5-year-old period. Regarding children’s lifestyle factors at the 1.5-year-old period, pre-chewing food and breastfeeding produced significant caries susceptibility in both 2.5- and 3.5-year-old period. Additionally, children’s life styles were analyzed to have an impact on caries only at the 2.5-year-old period. For children’s life style at the 2.5-year-old period, increased frequency of snack, irregular snack time, and brushing without assistance by the mother put 3.5-year-old children at high risk of developing caries. A caries activity test could predict 2.5-, and 3.5-year-old children’s caries risk based on the 1.5-year-old test result. Some children’s life styles at an early age showed a higher risk of developing caries at a later age.

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