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SOIL-WATER COUPLED FINITE DEFORMATION ANALYSIS BASED ON A RATE-TYPE EQUATION OF MOTION INCORPORATING THE SYS CAM-CLAY MODEL

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  • Soil-water coupled finite deformation analysis based on a rate-type equation of motion incorporating the SYS Cam-slay model

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Abstract

This paper presents a new method of soil-water coupled finite deformation analysis of saturated soils that considers inertial forces. This method allows changes in the geometric shape of the soil to be taken into account and is capable of dealing with all types of external forces irrespective of whether they are static or dynamic. To be more specific, the paper describes the following points, which differ from the conventional methods: 1) the governing equations for saturated soil including the rate-type equation of motion containing a jerk term of the soil skeleton conforming to u-p formulation and updated Lagrangian, 2) derivation of a weak form of the rate-type equation of motion and discretization of the finite elements, and 3) use of the implicit time integration method for application of the conventional linear acceleration method (which assumes linear variation of acceleration) to the jerk term. By mounting the elasto-plastic constitutive equation (SYS Cam-clay model), which can cover a wide range of soils and soil conditions, onto the above method of analysis, examples of simulation of dynamic/static triaxial laboratory testing of saturated soil specimens are described. The soil specimens were assumed to be medium dense sand under conditions of small-amplitude cyclic loading, partial drainage, and constant cell pressure. The simulation yielded the following results: (1) In the case of low frequencies, compaction occurs during loading and compression progresses over the entire specimen. (2) In the case of high frequencies, during loading and in the period in which wave propagation continues within the specimen after the end of loading, compaction occurs at the drained end of the specimen, whereas liquefaction occurs in its interior. After this stage, massive compression takes place within the specimen, leading to consolidation (consolidation after liquefaction).<br>

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