Dietary calcium intake is associated with serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level in the general Japanese population

  • Katsuura-Kamano Sakurako
    Department of Preventive Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School
  • Uemura Hirokazu
    Department of Preventive Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School
  • Yamaguchi Miwa
    Department of Nutritional Science and Metabolism, National Institutes of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition
  • Nakamoto Mariko
    Department of Public Health and Applied Nutrition, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School
  • Bahari Tirani
    Department of Preventive Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School
  • Miki Keisuke
    Department of Preventive Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School
  • Ishizu Masashi
    Department of Preventive Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School
  • Sawachika Fusakazu
    Department of Preventive Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School
  • Arisawa Kokichi
    Department of Preventive Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Tokushima University Graduate School

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Abstract

<p>The beneficial effects of dietary calcium intake on high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels, a risk factor of cardiovascular disease, have not been fully elucidated. This study investigated the associations between dietary calcium intake and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in the general Japanese population. We analyzed the data of 2,019 subjects (1,194 men and 825 women) aged 35 to 69 years in a cross-sectional study of the Japan Multi-Institutional Collaborative Cohort Study. Nutrients intake including calcium were estimated using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Analysis using a general linear model revealed that dietary calcium intake was inversely associated with serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (p for trend <0.001) after adjustment for age, sex, research group, leisure-time physical activity, smoking habit, drinking habit, dietary intakes (energy, dietary fiber, saturated fatty acids and vitamin D) and menopausal status. The association was slightly attenuated after additional adjustment for body mass index; however, remained significant (p for trend = 0.008). There were no significant interactions between dietary calcium intakes and sex, body mass index, or vitamin D intake for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels. This study have demonstrated that dietary calcium intake was inversely associated with serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in the general population.</p>

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