The Hypolepis punctata community established under severe feeding pressure by sika deer and its application to revegetation

  • Ishida Hiroaki
    Institute of Natural and Environmental Sciences, University of Hyogo
  • Hattori Tamotsu
    Institute of Natural and Environmental Sciences, University of Hyogo
  • Kodate Seiji
    Institute of Natural and Environmental Sciences, University of Hyogo
  • Kuroda Asumo
    Institute of Natural and Environmental Sciences, University of Hyogo
  • Sawada Yoshihiro
    Institute of Natural and Environmental Sciences, University of Hyogo
  • Matsumura Toshikazu
    Graduate School of Human Development and Environment, Kobe University
  • Fujiki Daisuke
    Institute of Natural and Environmental Sciences, University of Hyogo

Bibliographic Information

Other Title
  • ニホンジカの強度採食下に発達するイワヒメワラビ群落の生態的特性とその緑化への応用
  • ニホンジカ ノ キョウド サイショクカ ニ ハッタツスル イワヒメワラビ グンラク ノ セイタイテキ トクセイ ト ソノ リョッカ エノ オウヨウ

Search this article

Abstract

In areas with high sika deer density the loss of regenerated vegetation at previously deforested sites, due to herbivory, is a serious problem. However, there are plant species with anti-herbivory strategies, such as Hypolepis punctata, that form a relatively large community at deforested sites under severe feeding pressure by sika deer. This suggests that planting H. punctata may be effective in improving the revegetation of such places. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of revegetation using H. punctata, we investigated stands of the H. punctata community and areas of bare ground at deforested sites in the southern part of Awaji Island in Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. We also investigated secondary forests in the vicinity of the deforested sites. The stands of the H. punctata community were similar to the secondary forests with regards to soil depth and soil chemistry. Soil erosion was clearly observed at the bare ground sites. The number of forest species per 25m^2 was higher in the stands of the H. punctata community than in the secondary forests. Comparison of species composition between the three types of site showed that most species found in the secondary forests were also present in the stands of the H. punctata community. These results suggest that the H. punctata community has a high capacity to reduce erosion and maintain forest species richness. Thus, we concluded that H. punctata is a useful species for the revegetation of deforested sites that are under severe feeding pressure by sika deer.

Journal

Citations (2)*help

See more

References(56)*help

See more

Details 詳細情報について

Report a problem

Back to top