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Incentive program to strengthen motivation for increasing physical activity via conjoint analysis

DOI PubMed Open Access
  • MATSUSHITA Munehiro
    Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokorozawa, Saitama, Japan
  • HARADA Kazuhiro
    Graduate School of Human Development and Environment, Kobe University, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan
  • ARAO Takashi
    Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Tokorozawa, Saitama, Japan

Bibliographic Information

Other Title
  • 身体活動量増加の動機づけに効果的なインセンティブプログラム:コンジョイント分析
  • シンタイ カツドウリョウ ゾウカ ノ ドウキズケ ニ コウカテキ ナ インセンティブプログラム : コンジョイント ブンセキ

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Abstract

<p>Objectives Promoting physical activity is a key public health issue. Incentive programs have attracted attention as a technique for promoting physical activity. For the use of effective incentives, there is a need to clarify the most effective incentive program conditions for the promotion of physical activity. Therefore, the present study used the conjoint analysis to examine the effective incentive program conditions for strengthening the motivation to increase physical activity.</p><p>Methods Data on 1,998 subjects (aged 40-74) were analyzed. The main variables in this study were physical activity (IPAQ-Short Form) and the strengthening of motivation to increase physical activity. The incentive programs that were implemented, comprised four factors: 1) cash equivalents (1,000 yen, 2,000 yen, and 3,000 yen); 2) duration between increase in physical activity and receipt of the incentive (1, 2, or 3 months); 3) method to record the physical activity (recording sheet, recording website, and automatic pedometer recording); and 4) lottery (yes or no). Eleven incentive programs were created, which was the minimum number required for comparison of these factors and levels. The average importance of each of the four factors was calculated to compare their contributions to the strengthening of the motivation to increase physical activity. The utility of each level was also calculated to compare their contributions to the strengthening of motivation. All statistics were stratified by age (≤65 years and 65+ years) and physical activity (<150 min/week, 150+ min/week) for additional analysis.</p><p>Results Cash incentives and the lottery ranked equally on average importance, followed by duration and recording methods. Utility was higher for each factor, as follows: 1) more valuable cash incentives, 2) shorter duration, 3) automatic pedometer recording, and 4) no lottery. There was no notable difference in the average importance and utility of age and physical activity.</p><p>Conclusions The results of this study suggest that no lottery and more valuable incentives were important for improving the effectiveness of incentive programs in increasing physical activity. Moreover, these two factors would be important regardless of age and physical activity levels. Further intervention studies on incentive programs for increasing physical activity considering the present results are needed.</p>

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