Actual Condition Survey about Occupational Health Nursing Activities at Hospitals with more than 100 beds

DOI
  • Mizuno-Lewis Satomi
    Yokkaichi Nursing and Medical Care University Research Centre
  • Takayama Naoko
    Yokkaichi Nursing and Medical Care University Research Centre
  • Kondo Nobuko
    Yokkaichi Nursing and Medical Care University Research Centre
  • Hatanaka Junko
    Yokkaichi Nursing and Medical Care University Research Centre
  • Goto Yuki
    Yokkaichi Nursing and Medical Care University Research Centre
  • Kono Keiko
    Yokkaichi Nursing and Medical Care University Research Centre

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Other Title
  • 100床以上の医療機関における産業看護活動についての実態調査

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Abstract

<p>The level of occupational health for medical staff working at medical facilities in Japan lags behind other countries. The main reason for this situation is that the administrations of facilities have been depending on medical staff for occupational health carrying out the functions of occupational health themselves because they are medical professional groups. Administration also believes it is staff responsibility to look after their own health.The purpose of this research is to explore further activities for promoting occupational health in medical facilities nationwide, focusing on the placement of occupational health nurses. A questionnaire was sent to 2573 nurse managers of hospitals with more than 100 beds. The questionnaire asked whether occupational health activities were undertaken or not, the contents of activities, and obstructive factors of activities.</p><p>Results: 649 questionnaires were returned. The number of medical facilities with a fulltime occupational health nurse (OHN) (with no other duty) for staff was 36 (5.6%); part time OHN (with other duty to fulltime worker) was 43 (6.6%) and no OHN for medical staff 568 (87.5%). The OHNs’ employment conditions were full time and part time. The qualifications of OHNs are RN and Health Nurse. A significant reason given for not employing OHNs for medical staff was ‘having no idea of the role of OHNs’: 20% indicated low recognition of the issues of occupational health and misunderstanding the roles of OHNs, as well as weakness in assisting the development of human resources.</p>

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