Smoking cessation after long-term sick leave due to cancer in comparison with cardiovascular disease: Japan Epidemiology Collaboration on Occupational Health Study

Search this article

Description

<p>In occupational settings, smokers may take quitting smoking seriously if they experienced long-term sick leave due to cancer or cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, no study has elucidated the smoking cessation rate after long-term sick leave. We examined the smoking cessation rate after long-term sick leave due to cancer and CVD in Japan. We followed 23 survivors who experienced long-term sick leave due to cancer and 39 survivors who experienced long-term sick leave due to CVD who reported smoking at the last health exam before the leave. Their smoking habits before and after the leave were self-reported. Logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted smoking cessation rates. Smoking cessation rate after long-term sick leave due to cancer was approximately 70% and that due to CVD exceeded 80%. The adjusted smoking cessation rate was 67.6% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 47.0, 88.2) for cancer and 80.7% (95% CI: 67.7, 93.8) for CVD. Smoking cessation rate after a longer duration of sick leave (≥60 d) tended to increase for both CVD and cancer. Although any definite conclusion cannot be drawn, the data suggest that smoking cessation rate after long-term sick leave due to CVD is slightly higher than that for cancer.</p>

Journal

  • Industrial Health

    Industrial Health 58 (3), 246-253, 2020

    National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health

References(28)*help

See more

Details 詳細情報について

Report a problem

Back to top