Evaluation index of epilepsy-like seizures observed in common degu (<i>Octodon degus</i>)

  • Ikai Yuki
    Graduate School of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of Miyazaki Division of Bio-resources, Department of Biotechnology, Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki
  • Shinohara Akio
    Division of Bio-resources, Department of Biotechnology, Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki
  • Nagura-Kato Goro A.
    Division of Bio-resources, Department of Biotechnology, Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki
  • Shichijo Hiroki
    Division of Bio-resources, Department of Biotechnology, Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki
  • Koshimoto Chihiro
    Division of Bio-resources, Department of Biotechnology, Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki

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Other Title
  • デグー(<i>Octodon degus</i>)に観察されるてんかん様発作の評価指標
  • デグー(Octodon degus)に観察されるてんかん様発作の評価指標
  • デグー(Octodon degus)ニ カンサツ サレル テンカン ヨウ ホッサ ノ ヒョウカ シヒョウ

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Abstract

<p>The common degu (Octodon degus), originally native to South America, is now widely used as an experimental animal owing to several unique characteristics: common degus are highly social and use vocal sounds as communication tools. Importantly, their brain function is more complex than other laboratory rodents, making them a good model in the field of neuroscience. We established a colony of laboratory common degus and observed epilepsy-like seizures. We subsequently analyzed the process, strength, and duration of seizures by video recording. We examined 35 video images from 16 individuals (7 females and 9 males). The seizures began as abnormalities in the body parts (step 1), and then systemic tonic-clonic seizure (step 2) was observed. Following step 2, a short period of stillness (step 3) usually occurred, and then systemic tonic seizure occurred again (step 4). Ultimately, stillness (step 5) continued until recovery. We found sex-based differences in the strength and duration of seizures and observed large individual differences as well. Our results suggest that common degus have the potential to be used as a disease model for epilepsy.</p>

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