[Updated on Apr. 18] Integration of CiNii Articles into CiNii Research

Dysphagia and mucositis after concurrent chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer

  • TSUNEYUKI Miki
    Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Kobe University Hospital
  • MAEDA Tatsuyoshi
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine
  • YONEZAWA Kouichiro
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine
  • MORIMOTO Koichi
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine
  • TANIMOTO Hitoshi
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine
  • SAITO Miki
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine
  • OTSUKI Naoki
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine
  • NIBU Ken-ichi
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine

Bibliographic Information

Other Title
  • 頭頸部癌患者における同時併用化学放射線療法後の口内炎と嚥下障害についての検討

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Abstract

A speech therapist performs swallowing rehabilitation in this hospital because concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for head and neck cancer is commonly associated with, dysphagia. An evaluation of oral mucositis and dysphagia after CCRT was conducted to determine the relationship between swallowing rehabilitation and swallowing disability. A total of 51 patients (44 males and 7 females) with a mean age of 63 years (range, 39 to 80), underwent CCRT with or without neck dissection between April 2008 and November 2009. Oral mucositis and dysphagia were graded at the end of CCRT according to CTCAE, version 4.0. Seventeen of 51 patients underwent swallowing rehabilitation, exercise and education on muscle strengthening programs before and during CCRT. The average grades of oral mucositis of patients with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer patients were 1.8, 2.1, 1.8, and 0.8, respectively. There was a lower incidence of oral mucositis in patients with laryngeal cancer than in those with oropharyngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer. The average grades of dysphagia of patients with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, hypopharyngeal, and laryngeal cancer were 2.4, 2.7, 2.2, and 1.2. Dysphagia was most severe in the patients with oropharyngeal cancer, while it was minimal in those with laryngeal cancer. Seventeen diligent patients that underwent swallowing rehabilitation every day rarely developed severe dysphagia.

Journal

  • jibi to rinsho

    jibi to rinsho 56 (Suppl.2), S240-S245, 2010

    JIBI TO RINSHO KAI

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